1310 Bannock St
Denver, CO, USA

  • Architectural Style: Victorian
  • Bathroom: N/A
  • Year Built: 1890
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • Square Feet: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Aug 25, 1970
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture / Social History
  • Bedrooms: N/A
  • Architectural Style: Victorian
  • Year Built: 1890
  • Square Feet: N/A
  • Bedrooms: N/A
  • Bathroom: N/A
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Aug 25, 1970
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture / Social History
Neighborhood Resources:

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Aug 25, 1970

  • Charmaine Bantugan

National Register of Historic Places - Byers-Evans House (William Grey Evans)

Statement of Significant: Although the Byers-Evans House is an example of the large typical Victorian town house, its chief significance lies in its owners' prominence in Colorado's history and development. William Evans, son of John Evans, Colorado's first territorial governor, acquired the house from its original owner, Byers, in 1890. John Evans, as a Coloradoan, founded the Colorado Seminary (now Denver University), sponsored or developed rail- roads and industry. His son, William Grey Evans, carried on the progressive attitude of the governor. He participated in the construction of four railroads, organized the Denver Electric & Cable Company and became president of its successor, the Denver Tramway Company. In 1902 William became President of the Board of Trustees of the University of Denver. Ann Evans, daughter of the governor was a prominent figure in Denver's cultural affairs. Among other things, she was the co-founder of the Denver Art Museum. She was also a member of the New York World's Fair Commission, co-founder of the Central City Opera House Commission, and a member of the Denver Library Commission. The Byers-Evans House is regarded as a monument to the spirit of the Evans tradition. The present owners, Katherine and Josephine Evans maintain the house much as it was during their father's lifetime.

National Register of Historic Places - Byers-Evans House (William Grey Evans)

Statement of Significant: Although the Byers-Evans House is an example of the large typical Victorian town house, its chief significance lies in its owners' prominence in Colorado's history and development. William Evans, son of John Evans, Colorado's first territorial governor, acquired the house from its original owner, Byers, in 1890. John Evans, as a Coloradoan, founded the Colorado Seminary (now Denver University), sponsored or developed rail- roads and industry. His son, William Grey Evans, carried on the progressive attitude of the governor. He participated in the construction of four railroads, organized the Denver Electric & Cable Company and became president of its successor, the Denver Tramway Company. In 1902 William became President of the Board of Trustees of the University of Denver. Ann Evans, daughter of the governor was a prominent figure in Denver's cultural affairs. Among other things, she was the co-founder of the Denver Art Museum. She was also a member of the New York World's Fair Commission, co-founder of the Central City Opera House Commission, and a member of the Denver Library Commission. The Byers-Evans House is regarded as a monument to the spirit of the Evans tradition. The present owners, Katherine and Josephine Evans maintain the house much as it was during their father's lifetime.

1890

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