22 West Highland Drive
Seattle, WA, USA

  • Architectural Style: Queen Anne
  • Bathroom: N/A
  • Year Built: 1900
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • Square Feet: 8,280 sqft
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Mar 26, 1979
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Commerce / Architecture / Law
  • Bedrooms: N/A
  • Architectural Style: Queen Anne
  • Year Built: 1900
  • Square Feet: 8,280 sqft
  • Bedrooms: N/A
  • Bathroom: N/A
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Mar 26, 1979
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Commerce / Architecture / Law
Neighborhood Resources:

Property Story Timeline

You are the most important part of preserving home history.
Share pictures, information, and personal experiences.
Add Story I Lived Here

Mar 26, 1979

  • Charmaine Bantugan

National Register of Historic Places - Ballard-Howe House

Statement of Significant: Early residents of Seattle's Queen Anne hill have long referred to the Ballard/Howe house as a "landmark." It is one of the first homes of colonial style to be built in this area, and it is the last to survive in its original form. Many of its previous owners were prominent men who contributed greatly to Seattle's economic and social welfare. Several of Seattle's well known, early architects have contributed to the house's design. The house was commissioned in 1900 by Martin D. Ballard, a Seattle pioneer and businessman. Earlier in the year, he had purchased the entire block 9 of Comstock Addition for the site of his new home. cost of the house was estimated to be between $8,000 and $10,000, "according to ideas which may occur to Mr. Ballard during its construction." 1 Among his many activities, Mr. Ballard was in the hardware business, thus he had the knowledge and the means to attend to detail. When the house was complete in early 1901, it was an elegant structure on the south side of the sparsely populated Queen Anne hill. Mr. Ballard resided in this house until his death in April, 1907. In February, 1911, Mrs. Ballard sold the estate to Judge George Donworth for $20,000. The Donworths refurbished the house and redecorated it with new furniture, organdy and hand blocked linen curtains, velvet portieres and window seats, and new carpets. However, before the home could be occupied, Judge Donworth became ill and was ordered to take a long rest and a period of travel. As he was the owner of several residences, he was in a quandary as to which one to sell. In September, 1911, he consulted his good friend and former law partner, James B. Howe. Together they decided that the newly refurbished mansion would be the most saleable. The Colonial style house was of interest to Mr. and Mrs. Howe. They rode cable cars up Queen Anne hill to view it. This im- posing clean, white massive structure with its two-story columns was very reminiscent of their southern backgrounds. They thought it over that night and purchased the home the next day for $25,000. The Howes immediately landscaped the barren grounds. Some of the plantings, including the tall Lombardy Poplars, still grace the property today.

National Register of Historic Places - Ballard-Howe House

Statement of Significant: Early residents of Seattle's Queen Anne hill have long referred to the Ballard/Howe house as a "landmark." It is one of the first homes of colonial style to be built in this area, and it is the last to survive in its original form. Many of its previous owners were prominent men who contributed greatly to Seattle's economic and social welfare. Several of Seattle's well known, early architects have contributed to the house's design. The house was commissioned in 1900 by Martin D. Ballard, a Seattle pioneer and businessman. Earlier in the year, he had purchased the entire block 9 of Comstock Addition for the site of his new home. cost of the house was estimated to be between $8,000 and $10,000, "according to ideas which may occur to Mr. Ballard during its construction." 1 Among his many activities, Mr. Ballard was in the hardware business, thus he had the knowledge and the means to attend to detail. When the house was complete in early 1901, it was an elegant structure on the south side of the sparsely populated Queen Anne hill. Mr. Ballard resided in this house until his death in April, 1907. In February, 1911, Mrs. Ballard sold the estate to Judge George Donworth for $20,000. The Donworths refurbished the house and redecorated it with new furniture, organdy and hand blocked linen curtains, velvet portieres and window seats, and new carpets. However, before the home could be occupied, Judge Donworth became ill and was ordered to take a long rest and a period of travel. As he was the owner of several residences, he was in a quandary as to which one to sell. In September, 1911, he consulted his good friend and former law partner, James B. Howe. Together they decided that the newly refurbished mansion would be the most saleable. The Colonial style house was of interest to Mr. and Mrs. Howe. They rode cable cars up Queen Anne hill to view it. This im- posing clean, white massive structure with its two-story columns was very reminiscent of their southern backgrounds. They thought it over that night and purchased the home the next day for $25,000. The Howes immediately landscaped the barren grounds. Some of the plantings, including the tall Lombardy Poplars, still grace the property today.

1900

Property Story Timeline

You are the most important part of preserving home history.
Share pictures, information, and personal experiences.
Add Story I Lived Here

Similar Properties

See more
Ready to start your home history journey?
Sign up for a free HouseNovel account and receive our complimentary eBook on how to research your home's story.