2324 Emerson Ave S
Minneapolis, MN, USA

  • Architectural Style: Bungalow
  • Bathroom: 4
  • Year Built: 2002
  • National Register of Historic Places: N/A
  • Square Feet: 1,682 sqft
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: N/A
  • Neighborhood: Hawthorne
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: N/A
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Architectural Style: Bungalow
  • Year Built: 2002
  • Square Feet: 1,682 sqft
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathroom: 4
  • Neighborhood: Hawthorne
  • National Register of Historic Places: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: N/A
Neighborhood Resources:

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Jan 01, 2009

  • Charmaine Bantugan

2324 Emerson Ave S, Minneapolis, MN, USA

2324 Emerson Ave S Home History Liebenberg and Kaplan, 1928 / addition, Rabbi Max Shapiro Education Building, 1955 / addition, Bentz/Thompson/Rietow Architects, 1987 Initially known as Shaarai Tov (Gates of Goodness) and organized in 1878, this is the oldest Jewish congregation in Minneapolis. The congregation, which became Temple Israel in 1920, occupied several other buildings before constructing this Classical Revival-style synagogue. Symbolic elements are worked into the design, including the five front doors that represent the books of the Torah. The sanctuary is renowned for its acoustics. Architect Jack Liebenberg used tiles made from sugar beet stalks to modulate the sound. The tiles worked so well here that he also used them in his theaters, including the nearby Suburban World. The Rabbi Max Shapiro Education Building was added to the synagogue in 1955, and another addition completed in 1987 includes a small theater, meeting rooms, and offices. Citation: Millett, Larry. AIA Guide to the Minneapolis Lake District. Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2009.

2324 Emerson Ave S, Minneapolis, MN, USA

2324 Emerson Ave S Home History Liebenberg and Kaplan, 1928 / addition, Rabbi Max Shapiro Education Building, 1955 / addition, Bentz/Thompson/Rietow Architects, 1987 Initially known as Shaarai Tov (Gates of Goodness) and organized in 1878, this is the oldest Jewish congregation in Minneapolis. The congregation, which became Temple Israel in 1920, occupied several other buildings before constructing this Classical Revival-style synagogue. Symbolic elements are worked into the design, including the five front doors that represent the books of the Torah. The sanctuary is renowned for its acoustics. Architect Jack Liebenberg used tiles made from sugar beet stalks to modulate the sound. The tiles worked so well here that he also used them in his theaters, including the nearby Suburban World. The Rabbi Max Shapiro Education Building was added to the synagogue in 1955, and another addition completed in 1987 includes a small theater, meeting rooms, and offices. Citation: Millett, Larry. AIA Guide to the Minneapolis Lake District. Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2009.

2002

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