259 7th Ave
Salt Lake City, UT, USA

  • Architectural Style: Victorian
  • Bathroom: 8
  • Year Built: 1898
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • Square Feet: 9,156 sqft
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Jul 17, 1978
  • Neighborhood: Greater Avenues
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Architectural Style: Victorian
  • Year Built: 1898
  • Square Feet: 9,156 sqft
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Bathroom: 8
  • Neighborhood: Greater Avenues
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Jul 17, 1978
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture
Neighborhood Resources:

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Jul 17, 1978

  • Charmaine Bantugan

National Register of Historic Places - William H. Mclntyre House

Statement of Significant: The property on which the Mclntyre House sit s was registered to C. J. Sandbech on June 27, 1874, as Lot 2, Block 101, Plat D. The lo t was purchased by Gil l S. Peyton on January 26, 1894, for a price of $2,500.00 The structure was designed by architect Fredrich Hale and was first inhabited in 1898 and was called Payton Hall. The property, house, and carriage house were sold to Henry w. Brown on July 18, 1900, for a price of $15,000.00. William H. Mclntyre acquired the house on December 5, 1901 for $19,000.00 and the adjacent lo t (Lot #2) for a price of $2,000.00. the structure has been known as the Mclntyre House. Service connections are recorded as being made on April 17, 1906 and additional services and repairs were made August 8, 1910 William H. Mclntyre died on August 20, 1926. Mrs. Phoebe Mclntyre resided in the house until her death in 1945. William H. Mclntyre cams to Utah as a boy from Texas and his adventurous life was bound up with the development of the Utah cattle business. In late r life Mr. Mclntyre developed large holdings in Alberta, Canada, where he established the Mclntyre Ranch but he retained many interests in Utah and spent his las t years there, dying i n Salt Lake City in 1926 at the age of seventy-eight. He was born in Grimes County, Texas about fort y miles north of what is now the city of Houston, -in-the year 1848, the son of William Mclntyre who was of Scotch-Irish descent. William's brother, Samuel, along with William traveled to Texas about 1870 to sell some property owned by their father. After the sell was completed, they bought cattle and made the long trek back to Utah. In the spring of the next year, they sold the cattle for more than five times what they had paid. This gave them enough money to buy more cattle in Omaha and drive them to Utah. This partnership continued until sometime in the 1880s and gave the two brothers enough money to enter into several ventures, including the Mammoth Mine at Mammoth, Utah which then developed into a successful operation. During the 1880s, William had hard times in the cattle business losing almost an entire herd in the winter of 13bb-87. I n 1891 to 1894 William began investigating the possibility of purchasing land and in 1894 he purchased a full section of land near Cardston in Alberto, Canada. Ranching began shortly after the purchase. William H. Mclntyre was married to Phoebe Ogden Chase. She was the granddaughter of Isaac Chase, the first flour miller in Utah. Liberty Park was once the Isaac Chase farm, late r passing to Brigham Young. Phoebe Chase was born at the caretaker's house which still stands on Liberty Park.

National Register of Historic Places - William H. Mclntyre House

Statement of Significant: The property on which the Mclntyre House sit s was registered to C. J. Sandbech on June 27, 1874, as Lot 2, Block 101, Plat D. The lo t was purchased by Gil l S. Peyton on January 26, 1894, for a price of $2,500.00 The structure was designed by architect Fredrich Hale and was first inhabited in 1898 and was called Payton Hall. The property, house, and carriage house were sold to Henry w. Brown on July 18, 1900, for a price of $15,000.00. William H. Mclntyre acquired the house on December 5, 1901 for $19,000.00 and the adjacent lo t (Lot #2) for a price of $2,000.00. the structure has been known as the Mclntyre House. Service connections are recorded as being made on April 17, 1906 and additional services and repairs were made August 8, 1910 William H. Mclntyre died on August 20, 1926. Mrs. Phoebe Mclntyre resided in the house until her death in 1945. William H. Mclntyre cams to Utah as a boy from Texas and his adventurous life was bound up with the development of the Utah cattle business. In late r life Mr. Mclntyre developed large holdings in Alberta, Canada, where he established the Mclntyre Ranch but he retained many interests in Utah and spent his las t years there, dying i n Salt Lake City in 1926 at the age of seventy-eight. He was born in Grimes County, Texas about fort y miles north of what is now the city of Houston, -in-the year 1848, the son of William Mclntyre who was of Scotch-Irish descent. William's brother, Samuel, along with William traveled to Texas about 1870 to sell some property owned by their father. After the sell was completed, they bought cattle and made the long trek back to Utah. In the spring of the next year, they sold the cattle for more than five times what they had paid. This gave them enough money to buy more cattle in Omaha and drive them to Utah. This partnership continued until sometime in the 1880s and gave the two brothers enough money to enter into several ventures, including the Mammoth Mine at Mammoth, Utah which then developed into a successful operation. During the 1880s, William had hard times in the cattle business losing almost an entire herd in the winter of 13bb-87. I n 1891 to 1894 William began investigating the possibility of purchasing land and in 1894 he purchased a full section of land near Cardston in Alberto, Canada. Ranching began shortly after the purchase. William H. Mclntyre was married to Phoebe Ogden Chase. She was the granddaughter of Isaac Chase, the first flour miller in Utah. Liberty Park was once the Isaac Chase farm, late r passing to Brigham Young. Phoebe Chase was born at the caretaker's house which still stands on Liberty Park.

1898

Property Story Timeline

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