1021 Park Avenue
Manhattan, New York, NY, USA

  • Architectural Style: Art Deco
  • Bathroom: 5.5
  • Year Built: 1907
  • National Register of Historic Places: N/A
  • Square Feet: 124,648 sqft
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: N/A
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: N/A
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Architectural Style: Art Deco
  • Year Built: 1907
  • Square Feet: 124,648 sqft
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathroom: 5.5
  • Neighborhood: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: N/A
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: N/A
Neighborhood Resources:

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Apr 07, 2023

  • Charmaine Bantugan

Pinchot House

Built in 1907, for Amos R.E. Pinchot (1872-1944) and his first wife, Gertrude Minturn (1871-1939). Standing on the north east corner of East 85th Street and Park Avenue, it rose four-stories high with a facade of 82-feet and a depth of 42-feet. It was designed by Richard Howland Hunt, the eldest son of the more famous architect Richard Morris Hunt who designed Pinchot's childhood and later country home, Grey Towers, in Pennsylvania. By 1914, the Pinchot marriage was strained and he leased his home to Vincent Astor. Two years later, its new tenant was Mrs Maggie Vanderbilt whose husband had died on the Lusitania in the previous year. She kept this as a townhouse while mainly living at Ventfort Hall. In 1917, it was leased to J.C. Baldwin Jr., of Mount Kisco, for $20,000 a year, and it was sold later that same year.... In 1917, Pinchot's political career was at rock bottom and before divorcing his wife he sold his townhouse to Edward Stettinius (1865-1925), President of the Diamond Match Company in Barberton, Ohio. Stettinius had come to New York as a partner in J.P. Morgan to co-ordinate purchasing war supplies for the Allied armies. The house was then valued at $210,000, of which $135,000 was land value. He died in 1925 at his country home in Locust Valley and left everything including his townhouse in Manhattan to his wife, Judith. She sold up just two years later to developers and in 1928 it was announced that Anthony Campagna would build a 14-story co-operative in its place that still stands today.

Pinchot House

Built in 1907, for Amos R.E. Pinchot (1872-1944) and his first wife, Gertrude Minturn (1871-1939). Standing on the north east corner of East 85th Street and Park Avenue, it rose four-stories high with a facade of 82-feet and a depth of 42-feet. It was designed by Richard Howland Hunt, the eldest son of the more famous architect Richard Morris Hunt who designed Pinchot's childhood and later country home, Grey Towers, in Pennsylvania. By 1914, the Pinchot marriage was strained and he leased his home to Vincent Astor. Two years later, its new tenant was Mrs Maggie Vanderbilt whose husband had died on the Lusitania in the previous year. She kept this as a townhouse while mainly living at Ventfort Hall. In 1917, it was leased to J.C. Baldwin Jr., of Mount Kisco, for $20,000 a year, and it was sold later that same year.... In 1917, Pinchot's political career was at rock bottom and before divorcing his wife he sold his townhouse to Edward Stettinius (1865-1925), President of the Diamond Match Company in Barberton, Ohio. Stettinius had come to New York as a partner in J.P. Morgan to co-ordinate purchasing war supplies for the Allied armies. The house was then valued at $210,000, of which $135,000 was land value. He died in 1925 at his country home in Locust Valley and left everything including his townhouse in Manhattan to his wife, Judith. She sold up just two years later to developers and in 1928 it was announced that Anthony Campagna would build a 14-story co-operative in its place that still stands today.

1907

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