1030 Logan St
Denver, CO, USA

  • Architectural Style: Greek Revival
  • Bathroom: 3
  • Year Built: 1890
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • Square Feet: 1,550 sqft
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Jun 03, 1982
  • Neighborhood: Capitol Hill
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Architectural Style: Greek Revival
  • Year Built: 1890
  • Square Feet: 1,550 sqft
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Bathroom: 3
  • Neighborhood: Capitol Hill
  • National Register of Historic Places: Yes
  • National Register of Historic Places Date: Jun 03, 1982
  • National Register of Historic Places Area of Significance: Architecture
Neighborhood Resources:

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Jun 03, 1982

  • Charmaine Bantugan

National Register of Historic Places - Stearns House

Statement of Significant: The Stearns residence is significant for its unique architecture, as an example of the work of architect Harry T. E. Wendell, and for its connection with the Joel W. Stearns family. The beautiful mansion at 1030 Logan is one of Capitol Hill's most unusual homes. In all of Emery's Capitol Hill Addition, one of the city's oldest, only a handful of homes show the influence of Spanish architecture. With its Mission characteristics, its symmetry and simple massing of elements, the home was ahead of its day. Almost fifteen years later the style became popular in Denver's new suburbs. The Rocky Mountain News took note of the unusual home when the Stearns family took possession of it in 1896. They called it "a very unique residence," a mixture of Spanish and Mexican styles that "never fails to attract notice from passersby." The use of white pressed brick was also unusual during the 1890's. The material became progressively more popular with builders after the turn of the century. There are few remaining examples of the architect T. E. Wendell. Four of his works are listed as Denver Landmarks; the residence on Logan Street, the Pope-Thompson- Wasson House at 1320 Race Street, and the Ivy Chapel and Gate Lodge at Fairmont Cemetery. The two examples at Fairmont are in the Victorian Gothic style, while the two residences show Wendell's more progressive turn of mind. The home at 1030 Logan Street was built for Joel Wilder Stearns and his family. Stearns was president and general manager of the Mountain Electric Company. He was born in Brooklyn in 1868 and educated at Columbia University. He came to Denver in 1885, established his company, and became one of the prominent young business and club men in the city. He lived in the Logan Street home with his wife Gertrude and son Joel, Jr. Through the years, without fail, the family name appeared in the Denver Social Register and newspapers constantly carried stories of their parties on the social pages. In the summers--when they were not living at their summer retreat at Estes Park--the Stearns often held garden parties under the arbor in the yard, strewing tables with fall leaves and spring flowers and entertaining their affluent neighbors at gourmet dinners. Stearns died of typhoid in 1920 at the age of fifty-two. Mrs. Stearns, Joel Jr., who had taken over as president of the electric company, and Joel's wife Marion remained in the house. The two women occupied the home for only two years after Joel Jr.'s death in 1927. The home had a series of owners and renters after the Stearn's family and began its slow decline from home to apartment to boarding house after 1940. Only recently has it regained its old beauty and begun to "attract notice from passersby."

National Register of Historic Places - Stearns House

Statement of Significant: The Stearns residence is significant for its unique architecture, as an example of the work of architect Harry T. E. Wendell, and for its connection with the Joel W. Stearns family. The beautiful mansion at 1030 Logan is one of Capitol Hill's most unusual homes. In all of Emery's Capitol Hill Addition, one of the city's oldest, only a handful of homes show the influence of Spanish architecture. With its Mission characteristics, its symmetry and simple massing of elements, the home was ahead of its day. Almost fifteen years later the style became popular in Denver's new suburbs. The Rocky Mountain News took note of the unusual home when the Stearns family took possession of it in 1896. They called it "a very unique residence," a mixture of Spanish and Mexican styles that "never fails to attract notice from passersby." The use of white pressed brick was also unusual during the 1890's. The material became progressively more popular with builders after the turn of the century. There are few remaining examples of the architect T. E. Wendell. Four of his works are listed as Denver Landmarks; the residence on Logan Street, the Pope-Thompson- Wasson House at 1320 Race Street, and the Ivy Chapel and Gate Lodge at Fairmont Cemetery. The two examples at Fairmont are in the Victorian Gothic style, while the two residences show Wendell's more progressive turn of mind. The home at 1030 Logan Street was built for Joel Wilder Stearns and his family. Stearns was president and general manager of the Mountain Electric Company. He was born in Brooklyn in 1868 and educated at Columbia University. He came to Denver in 1885, established his company, and became one of the prominent young business and club men in the city. He lived in the Logan Street home with his wife Gertrude and son Joel, Jr. Through the years, without fail, the family name appeared in the Denver Social Register and newspapers constantly carried stories of their parties on the social pages. In the summers--when they were not living at their summer retreat at Estes Park--the Stearns often held garden parties under the arbor in the yard, strewing tables with fall leaves and spring flowers and entertaining their affluent neighbors at gourmet dinners. Stearns died of typhoid in 1920 at the age of fifty-two. Mrs. Stearns, Joel Jr., who had taken over as president of the electric company, and Joel's wife Marion remained in the house. The two women occupied the home for only two years after Joel Jr.'s death in 1927. The home had a series of owners and renters after the Stearn's family and began its slow decline from home to apartment to boarding house after 1940. Only recently has it regained its old beauty and begun to "attract notice from passersby."

1890

Property Story Timeline

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Share pictures, information, and personal experiences.
Add Story I Lived Here

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